Makore
  • Welcome to Parchment, the blog of David M. Schwarz Architects. In this space our team will share our musings, thoughts, and perspectives about architecture, design, and place making, all of which are rooted in our belief in humanism and a humanistic approach to design that gives us people-sensitive, pedestrian-friendly, socially active architecture defined by characteristics, not style. Our aim is to inform, inspire, and provoke thoughtful discourse about architecture today. We hope you will join the conversation.
Makore

Craftsmanship Series: The Use of Wood in Architecture and Design, Part I

As part of our Craftsmanship in Architecture Series, we will be discussing the use of wood in architecture and design. This topic will span several posts, with this first one focusing on wood sources, sustainable considerations, and species selection criteria. Wood is a nearly perfect building material. A renewable resource, it is readily available and … Continue reading

Featured Image

Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of The Ballpark in Arlington

The following was authored by DMSAS Architect Jon Zubiller. Jon attended Carnegie-Mellon University where he received his Bachelor of Science in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Bachelor of Architecture. Jon joined the firm in 2001.  As we finally (hopefully) break away from this long-winter’s grip, our attention turns to the boys of summer, as they take … Continue reading

The Guggenheim Museum in New York City

What Makes a Building Modern? A Few Words on Architectural Language

The following was authored by DMSAS Architect Chris Teigen. Chris graduated Cum Laude from the University of Notre Dame where he received his Bachelor of Architecture. He has been with the firm since 2008. Architects often talk about architecture in what amounts to a unique language. This language is used to describe everything from historical … Continue reading

GC Capital

Craftsmanship: For the Love of Limestone

Limestone is found all over the world: as soft, yellow stone in southern England, creamy buff stone in southern France, a variety of interesting colors found in the Burgundy region, as well as numerous types in Portugal and Asia. It has been used as a building material for thousands of years: from the pyramids of … Continue reading

Buildings Worth Saving?

Is THAT Building Worth Saving? The Metrics of Preservation

The following post was authored by Principal Craig Williams, and states positions on a few current controversial issues. The positions are those of the author. Friends and followers of the firm know that our practice was founded 35 years ago when we worked in many of Washington’s historic districts doing townhouse renovations and additions, along … Continue reading

Nelsonville Sketch

Chance Discoveries in the GPS Age: Nelsonville, Ohio

It happens that the state of Ohio has only one National Forest, and in the midst of that forest, nestled among the hills of the Hocking River Valley, is a small city called Nelsonville. It is seemingly unremarkable – it has a population of just over 5,000 and a technical college, but on a long … Continue reading

Lopud, Croatia July 2009

Places We Love, Part II

On this Valentine’s day, we finish our look at some of our staff’s favorite places on earth. These places represent the connections we make with the places we work and play; sometimes a brief encounter, sometimes a mainstay of everyday life. In case you missed Part I, you can check it our here. We hope … Continue reading

botanicgarden-washingtondc6

Places We Love, Part I

In honor of Valentine’s Day, we once again spoke with our staff about the buildings, spaces, and places they love the most. The subjects of our affection vary in form and function, but they all have some unique draw that earns our admiration. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do and we encourage … Continue reading

New Palace

Rebuilding The Past: The Controversial Case of Berlin’s Stadtschloss, Part II

This post is the second in a two-part series by DMSAS Intern Architect Julian Murphy. Before joining the firm full time last summer, Julian served as a DMSAS Travel Fellow from the University of Notre Dame. Julian graduated from Notre Dame with an BArch in May 2012. You can read Part I of the series here. The … Continue reading

SchlossBerlin

Rebuilding The Past: The Controversial Case of Berlin’s Stadtschloss, Part I

This post is the first in a two-part series by DMSAS Intern Architect Julian Murphy. Before joining the firm full time last summer, Julian served as a DMSAS Travel Fellow from the University of Notre Dame. Julian graduated from Notre Dame with an BArch in May 2012. As a part of my DMSAS travel fellowship, … Continue reading

  • www.dmsas.com

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 741 other followers